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  1. #1
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    BAC Gets PSA Approval

    The BAcC is delighted to announce that it is now accredited by the Professional Standards Authority (PSA). As one of only two organisations currently accredited (along with the British Association of Counseling and Psychotherapy), it offers members enhanced status with the public, with the NHS, private health insurers and the Government.

    Harry Cayton, Chief Executive of the PSA said: “We are very pleased to accredit BAcC. Bringing acupuncture into a broad framework of assurance is good for patient, service users and the public and is the best way to promote quality. The scheme offers enhanced protection to anyone looking for health and social care services, and gives acupuncture the opportunity to demonstrate its commitment.”

    Nick Pahl commented “This is great news for members, who can use it as a mark of quality. The PSA state that accreditation does not imply that the Authority has assessed the merits of individuals on the register - this remains the responsibility of the BAcC. Accreditation means that BAcC’s register meets the Professional Standards Authority’s high standards in governance, standard-setting, education and training, management, complaints and information.

    As part of next steps, BAcC’s will be meeting with the Authority later in February to receive a communications toolkit advising the BAcC and members on key messages about accreditation and on the use and regulations of the accreditation mark. Wider dissemination of the mark cannot occur until the signed agreement is in place.

    BAcC are also in discussion with BUPA regarding a change in their policy to allow BAcC registered members to be able to claim for patient treatments now that we are accredited with the PSA. Further discussions are planned with AXA/PPP Healthcare and the NHS Blood and Transplant Service.

  2. #2
    Modern Chinese Medicine does not put a strong emphasis on point location. If you watch a modern TCM practitioner from China needle you will often witness a blur of needle insertion. I was always amazed at how quickly 20 needles could be placed into a person, literally within 60 seconds. The problem here is, acupoints are 1-2 millimeters in diameter. Being more than a couple millimeters away from the center of an acupuncture point will often result in minimal effect, and if any effect takes place it is usually of short duration. There simply is no possible way to locate the center of a true acupoint within seconds. . . well, unless you are enlightened, maybe.......
    jasicajhon

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by jollyllp View Post
    Modern Chinese Medicine does not put a strong emphasis on point location. If you watch a modern TCM practitioner from China needle you will often witness a blur of needle insertion. I was always amazed at how quickly 20 needles could be placed into a person, literally within 60 seconds. The problem here is, acupoints are 1-2 millimeters in diameter. Being more than a couple millimeters away from the center of an acupuncture point will often result in minimal effect, and if any effect takes place it is usually of short duration. There simply is no possible way to locate the center of a true acupoint within seconds. . . well, unless you are enlightened, maybe.......
    Are you saying that the Chinese get minimal results?

  4. #4
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    I am not quite sure how the subject of point location came up in regard to the first of this thread. I would see two aspects of accuracy in point location. The first is being in the right ball-park. Being careful with anatomy and individual cun measurements on the patient - many shortcuts of the use of the practitioners own fingers can be less than acurate. And allowing for some variations in tradition, being in one of few nearby ball-parks is OK by me. Next is finding the 'bulls eye' by touch. Five Element puts great emphasis on this I am not sure if it figures in all schools. And I would agree that 1 or 2 mm is the usual range in my experience and Five Element examination. My impression is that some rely on the purely anatomical ball-park. But what I have observed is that if one manipulates the needle enough in the 'ball-park' then one will sometimes get de qi, but if one is doing a minimal retention then one has to be in the bulls-eye or one will not.

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