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  1. #1

    Acupuncture and hypothyroidism.

    Who had any experience in treating hypothyroidism with acupuncture?

  2. #2
    What is the patient's age and gender?
    For adult hypothyroidism use points: St36,40, Ren22, Du4(moxa), Ren4,9,17, Du14(moxa), if female may add Lv3, Sp6, 8, Ren17, Pc6 etc. to help regular period.

  3. #3
    Thanks for the point combination. The patient is an adult male person, with tiredness and bad digestion as main symptoms.

  4. #4
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    Hypothyroidism

    Quote Originally Posted by vilderke View Post
    Thanks for the point combination. The patient is an adult male person, with tiredness and bad digestion as main symptoms.
    The first question: what is the diagnosis in terms of traditional Chinese medicine? As practioners of Chinese medicine the Western medical diagnosis (valuable as it is) is not our starting point. As a Five Element practitioner I say that even the Chinese syndrome diagnosis is second to consideration of the patient who has the condition.

    One simplistic way of looking at the difference between a Western disease name and a Chinese one, is that a disease in Chinese medicine is a verb not a noun. It is not something that can removed from the context of the patient and debated in isolation.

    Tiredness and bad digestion - very tentatively sounds like an Earth (Spleen/Stomach) issue. From a Five Element perspective one would ask how this came about. Did it arise in Earth or from another Element by transmission. Is this constitutionaly an Earth person. (for example).

    Even from a Western perspective there are important questions. Many patients I have seen are hypothyroid because they have had partial thyroidectomies to treat hyperthyroidism or radiation treatment. Surgeons prefer not to have repeat this so they generally favour removing more rather than less. For a Chinese perspective the patients underlying pathology was not cured, but their presentation is now more complicated in a way that presumably did not happen in the previous few thousand years. We also know that the thyroid generally does not regrow so they are probably going to have to take medication for the rest of their life.

    There is a controversial argument to diagnose hypothyroidism based upon a low basal temperature. Although not generally accepted by medical authority it is believed that hypothyroidism is much more common that officialy recognized and that many of our patients may be at least sub-clinically hypothyroid and presumably we are changing this whether we know or not - the wonder of Chinese medicine.

  5. #5
    Could a stressy lifestyle gives a hypofunction of the thyroid. In TCM terms, my patient had a spleen and kidney xu. But no yang xu symptoms. He is triathlete.

  6. #6
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    I would say most definitely. Western medicine is still having a hard time accepting stress as the cause of illness because they do not have a mechanism to explain the connection. A recent article in BBC health said that there is a new theory of the role of stress in interfering with the receptors to corticosteroids, and thus inflamation becomes the intermediary between stress and body. Which wonderfully dovetails with the concept of fire and heat pathology in Chinese medicine. In particular I find Yin Fire theory, and the Law of Similar Transformation and Six Stagnations to be some of the most signfiicant contributions to Chinese medicine after the Classic era. In other terms Liver Qi Stagnation (creating Fire), Spleen Damp Creating Fire, 'any of the six emotions creating Fire' etc. etc. And this model of traditional Chinese medicine, and modern understanding of inflamation and its role in chronic conditions, and stress and auto-immunity all dovetail without needing to modify traditional theory.

    Now here is a personal take: Wind as a Chinese character means change (fame, fashion, practices), in our modern world we are subject to a milieu of change more than literal winds and changeable weather. Also a lifestyle of sedentariness which I suggest is the modern 'Damp'. This constant change particularly taxes the two main Officials of the Wood Element: Liver & Strategic Planning and Gall-Bladder & Decision Making. And as the Nei Jing makes clear anything that taxes the Liver for a long time will drain the Kidneys. So I suggest that the type of Wind that we experience in modern life is different to the majority of history. But once again no need to modify existing theories. What as far as I know is my novel suggestion is the less literal meaning of the 'climates'.

  7. #7
    Its really amazing and nice.Thanx for sharing it.
    Brodon

  8. #8
    I think acupuncture can work with hypothyroidism.

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